Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies Woods Institute for the Environment Center on Food Security and the Environment Stanford University


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Prioritizing Investments in Food Security Under a Changing Climate

(Completed) Climate change and agricultural adaptation options in Africa.

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August 27th, 2012

FSE visiting scholar on extreme weather, economics and interdisciplinary learning

FSE, FSI Stanford News

Is this summer's drought a glimpse of our future under a changing climate, and how are rising prices affecting the world’s poor? FSE’s visiting scholar Thomas Hertel, an agricultural economist from Purdue University, discusses these questions and related research. Read more »



January 29th, 2012

Extreme heat shortens wheat growing season, reduces yield

FSE, FSI Stanford News

A new study out of Stanford finds extreme temperatures are cutting wheat yields in India by 20 to as much as 50 percent, a finding worse than previously estimated. As the world's second-biggest crop, lost wheat yields may become a major threat to global food security. +HTML+
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October 28th, 2011

Greater crop diversity and wild genes needed to feed growing population

FSI Stanford, FSE News

FSE Center fellow David Lobell provides a commentary in Nature Climate Change on the role of crop wild relatives and the need to invest in greater crop diversity. Over much of the world, the growing season of 2050 will probably be warmer than the hottest of recent years, with more variable rainfall. If we continue to grow the same crops in the same way, climate change will contribute to yield declines in many places. With potentially less food to feed more people, we have no choice but to adapt agriculture to the new conditions. Read more »



August 12th, 2011

Feeding a hotter, more crowded planet on NPR Science Friday

FSI Stanford, FSE in the news: National Public Radio on August 12, 2011

David Lobell's climate science research included in talk with NPR's Ira Flatow and guests Lester Brown, Gawain Kripke, and Gerald Nelson. They discuss the future of food security, and how farmers may need to adapt in coming generations.




July 1st, 2011

Mining the past to manage the future

FSI Stanford, FSE in the news: Climate Change Agriculture and Food Security on July 1, 2011

Past performance is not a perfect guide to future performance, but it is the only guide we have. It follows that scientific understanding of how agriculture will respond to future climates benefits tremendously from more precise information about past responses. An inspiring example is the paper Nonlinear Heat Effects on African Maize as Evidenced by Historical Yield Trials, by David Lobell, Marianne Bänziger, Cosmos Magorokosho and Bindiganavile Vivek, published in the inaugural issue of Nature Climate Change.




June 4th, 2011

New York Times quotes FSE's David Lobell in timely food security article

FSI Stanford, FSE in the news: New York Times on June 4, 2011

Though it has not yet happened in the United States, many important agricultural countries are already warming rapidly in the growing season, with average increases of several degrees. NYT article references FSE Center Fellow David Lobell's recently published paper on climate and agriculture which claims increasing temperatures have already suppressed crop yields in many countries. There has been an under-recognition of just how sensitive crops are to heat, and how fast heat exposure is increasing, said Lobell.




May 5th, 2011

US farmers dodge the impacts of global warming--at least for now

FSI Stanford, FSE News

The United States seems to have been lucky so far in largely escaping the impact of global warming on crop production. But for most major agricultural producing countries, the rising temperatures have already reduced their yields of corn and wheat compared to what they would have produced if there had been no warming, according to a new study led by Stanford researchers. +HTML+ +PDF+
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